Linkdump: December 2014

Katz & Maus

Flickery Flame Soldering Kits!

FlickeryFlame

In October, we released our Solderless Flickery Flame project, based on a tiny breadboard with six red and yellow candle-flicker LEDs, to give a fun and semi-realistic flame effect. Today, we’re releasing two new Flickery Flame Soldering Kits along the same lines, each of which has 6 candle-flicker LEDs, a little circuit board, and a battery holder.

FlickeryFlame

The Yellow/Red kit has the same mix of yellow and red candle-flicker LEDs that works so well in the breadboard kit.  This one will look great in a jack-o-lantern, luminaria, or scale-model fireplace.

FlickeryFlame

On the other hand, the White/Warm White kit has a mixture of (cool) white and warm white LEDs that give a modern wintery flame effect that has at least as much charm, but won’t be mistaken for a natural fire. This one will look great in all kinds of winter holiday decorations, luminarias, and props.

FlickeryFlame FlickeryFlame

Both the Yellow/Red and White/Warm White kits are fun, low-cost, self-contained, and easy soldering kits, which will be right at home both as stocking stuffers and as bite-size first projects for soldering workshops.

Interactive LED Cats

We were sent a picture of handsome cat Gandalf with an array of green Octolively kits all built up.

Mr. Pumpernickel also looks great in the green glow. Both Gandalf and Mr. Pumpernickel are continuing in a longstanding tradition of cats and interactive LEDs.

Harley Cat, Before frosting glass

Harley Cat (who passed away a few years ago) helped test our very first interactive LED project: our Interactive LED Dining Table.

Jellybean helped demonstrate a later project: our interactive LED coffee table. She is featured at about 48 seconds into this video.

LED Pez Menorah, this time with instructions!

Joyce wrote in this year with her latest Pez Menorah (using our Deluxe LED Menorah kit), featuring a Star Wars theme.

She also wrote up a thorough set of instructions on tumblr, which looks like a remarkably easy way to publish a step-by-step tutorial without using a platform like instructables. It may take some getting used to reading chronologically, but it is effective.

Previous Pez Menorah posts:

LED Metronome


After seeing our Larson Scanner kit, Martin shared this LED metronome project with us. Martin says:

It was designed as a “Visual Metronome”  So a learning music student could help see the timing by watching the green light.  There was to be an optional clicking sound  by using a small solenoid for the ticking – I chose that in place of a speaker for a more authentic sound.

The timing is a standard 555 timer which is fed to 7442 BCD to DECIMAL counter.  Next chip is a 74193 UP/DOWN counter.  When the count hits the last number, it sends a pulse to reverse the count or start over – depending on the toggle switch on the side.

There is also a pot on the 555 to control the speed.  All this was made in one night while I was working the graveyard shift.

The entire LED display was hand wired using a manual wire-wrap tool.

The chip pin labels on the back of the perf board are a particularly awesome relic of a different era of electronics assembly. Thanks for sharing your project photos and video with us!