Bike Lunch Bag in Print

bike bag in print2

Our bicycle frame lunch bag project is showing up in print in a couple of places. The August/September issue of Bust magazine is running the project along a couple of other bicycle-themed articles. It’s nice to see bicycle fashion spreads that don’t include spandex! I like the Schwinn they used for the article photo, too.

bike bag in print1

The bag is also included in a calendar for next year, Sewing: 2010 Day-to-Day Calendar, which just arrived in the mail today. There are two projects each week, and each project is printed on an 8 1/2″ x 11″ sheet of paper folded in half. The loose leaf sheets are stored in a magnetic closure box which converts to an easel, which also locks in place with a magnet. Magnetic boxes are awesome! The box would be great to reuse as a recipe box/stand, especially since you don’t have to use funny sized cards for it. The calendar format is a little odd, showing three or four days at a time, but that’s probably fine for a decorative calendar. The bike bag appropriately shows up on Earth day. I appreciated that the calendar included a project index, and that every project author was listed with their website so you can look up their other projects, too.

Bicycle lunch bag

The original project post is here.

Related projects:

Bicycle Frame Lunch Bag

Bicycle lunch bag

You’re headed somewhere on your bike and you want to bring your lunch along. Maybe you’re commuting or just headed to the park. Backpacks get warm, so you’d rather not wear one, and you don’t have a rack on your bike to pack your lunch on. Here’s a solution: a bike frame lunch bag you can make that will perfectly hold a box of leftovers or a sandwich. This one is designed for a standard “entree” sized plastic container, which is reasonably waterproof and acts as a structural integrity field for your sandwich.

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Bicycle Seat Cover Project

pretty, pretty

Vintage saddle

My vintage cruiser bike has an unusual seat post both in diameter and in the amount of taper at the top where the saddle mounts. I have not been able to locate a new saddle mounting bracket that will fit on the very small top of the seat post, nor will my non-standard mounting bracket fit on a replacement saddle, so I can’t just grab a replacement off the shelf. So, for both aesthetic and comfort reasons, I decided to make a seat cover.
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One minute project: Bike tube rubber bands

Patch  Set of bands

Once a bike tube needs its (n+1)th repair, where nis the number of times you’re willing to fix it, you can slice up what remains, and end up with a semi-infinite stash of cool looking rubber bands.

Useful? Yup. Cheap? You bet. Quick? Yes, to the point of being trivial.
On the other hand, not only is this a fun way to recycle, but using these is the office supplies equivalent of the secret biker’s handshake– only other bikers will even notice what you’re using.
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