All posts by Lenore Edman

About Lenore Edman

Co-founder of Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories.

AYAB v0.90 is here!

AYAB (all yarns are beautiful) Logo

The All Yarns Are Beautiful project has just released a new version of the AYAB software, v0.90!

It’s a bugfix-release, that means it fixes mostly known issues and no additional features are introduced. This is necessary to get more stability in the software and to have solid foundation for future developments.

If you’re using our AYAB Interface, we’d encourage you to upgrade. If you want to contribute to this project that brings new life to old Brother knitting machines, head over to the announcement to read more.

MOnSter 6502 at Maker Faire NY

We’re excited to be bringing the MOnSter 6502 out to Maker Faire New York for its east coast debut. Maker Faire is September 23 and 24 at the New York Hall of Science.

See how microcontrollers and computers work at the most basic level! We built a functional transistor-scale model of the famous 6502 microprocessor. In this larger than life model, you can visualize internal states and the flow of data.

So dust off your BASIC skills, or visit the Vintage Computer Federation’s BASIC classroom at Maker Faire and then come try it out on the MOnSter 6502.

The First X-Men cover with AxiDraw

Adam Sontag posted this great time lapse of using AxiDraw to draw the First X-Men cover in honor of Jack Kirby’s 100th Birthday.

Evil Mad Scientist is Moving: Save the Date for our Shopwarming Party

Evil Mad Scientist Shop Exterior

We’re in the process of moving into a nicer, bigger space, still in Sunnyvale, California. Our new shop location is 1285 Forgewood Avenue, and we’ll be closed on Monday, August 21 as part of the move.

We will be inviting you to our shopwarming party, which will be on October 7th, so please save the date!

Electronic Kintsugi

Vanessa Julia Carpenter from FabLabRUC did a workshop at FabCafe Tokyo with Kintsugi Artist Kurosawa using mended dishes as conductors in circuits.

The precious metals used to repair the dishes are used to trigger sound or light, encouraging the participants to connect with the dishes in interesting ways. There’s much more detail on this intersection of craft and electronics over in Vanessa’s post about the workshop.

Signal Generator Musical Instrument

Our friend Arjan van der Meij made this charming musical instrument from a signal generator, a servo motor, an Arduino and a processing program. He wrote an instructable for it so you can build one, too.

Signal Generator Instrument

He also wrote about his experience with the project in Dutch on makered.nl. Projects like this one, that started with a question (“Why don’t you build a machine to do it?”) are great for learning new skills. I often get asked what things someone should get for learning electronics, and my answer is usually that the first thing you need is a project that you want to make so that you’ll have motivation to research what you’ll need.

3d printed knob adapter connected to servo motor and signal generator

Arjan wanted to learn tinkercad, and used this project toward that goal by modeling the knob adapter he’d need for connecting his servo to his signal generator knob. Even if you don’t want to make a musical instrument from a signal generator, this project may provide inspiration for trying out new techniques.

Fractals with AxiDraw

Paul Butler wrote a tutorial on Fractal Generation with L-Systems and posted some example code with the output plotted by AxiDraw.

Fractal tree drawn by AxiDraw

The tutorial is also available as a Jupyter notebook with runnable code.