All posts by Lenore Edman

About Lenore Edman

Co-founder of Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories.

Star Wars Holiday Ornaments

Imperial crest & Rebel Alliance Ornaments

We’re getting into the spirit with a couple of seasonally appropriate decorations. The Rebel Alliance Ornament and the Imperial Crest Ornament for EggBot are both available on thingiverse. Our guide to printing ornaments with the EggBot may be helpful, too.

Both designs are derived from a set of silhouettes from vecteezy.com.

Interactive LED Christmas Tree

LED Christmas tree on Octolively derivative boards

Our friends at Mouser sent us this picture of their Octolively derived display, updated for the holidays:

We continue to have fun with your Octolively module design. In the attached photo you can see why we decided to use sockets for the LEDs on our boards.  We plan on changing out the display for each of the holidays.

I was a little concerned at first about using the red LEDs with resistors that were chosen for white or blue, but they’re socketed, so replacing any that get damaged by overdriving should be easy! Looks like a fun way to celebrate at the office, and the snowflake tree-topper is a nice touch.

EggBotting with Metallic Pens

Our friend Fran has been making holiday ornaments with the EggBot and writes:

I just wanted to let everyone know that I have finally gotten to be able to use the Pilot Gold/Silver Markers.

She suggests dividing the drawing into layers so that after each layer you can take the pen out to shake it to keep the ink flowing. We’ve added her tips to the wiki page about choosing pens for the EggBot.

If you have other tips for which pens you like to use or for working with ornaments, we’d love to hear about them!

DIY Mega Menorah 9000

LEDs in breadboard

Over on twitter, @shaiss says:

This is why #OSHA is awesome! In a pinch+some parts we made our electronic menorah. @EMSL design &  @adafruit trinket.

If you want to roll your own, the open source hardware documentation is on our wiki. If you’re not keen on the breadboard aesthetic for your hanukkiyah, you can still get the Mega Menorah 9000 kit.

A Retrospective of Lo-Res Digital Art from Maker Faire NY

Quin's B&W Selfie Camera

I came across some slips of paper from Maker Faire New York this year which can best be desribed as ephemeral low resolution digital art. Above is a B&W selfie from the Qduino Mini Thermal Printer.

Hive76's ASCII Camera

The ASCII Art Camera from Hive76 used a small inkjet printer and a webcam.

Plinko Poetry

Plinko Poetry created poetry by detecting the path of a disc falling between pegs across scrolling headlines.

word.camera

The most extreme example of this art form I came across was the word.camera ITP project by Ross Goodwin which algorithmically generates a sort of novelette from a source picture.

word.camera uses convolutional neural networks (via Clarifai) to extract concept words from images. It expands those initial words (mostly nouns) into sentences and paragraphs using a lexical relationship database (ConceptNet) and a flexible template system.

The source picture for mine can be viewed on the word.camera site along with the full text. You can generate new ones by uploading a picture, but that is not nearly as satisfying as interacting with it in person. The physical project was housed in a vintage camera body with a small thermal printer, so that the camera itself was generating the art.

Accidental Glitch Art

The confluence of inexpensive electronics and relative ease of working with embedded systems that made all this art possible can also generate unexpected results. This last piece of accidental glitch art is from Quin’s project: while trying to print a picture, it encountered an error and gave me a printout of unintelligible characters interspersed with bits of picture.


Related: CNC halftones with ASCII art

 

Octolively derivative at ARMTechCon

Mouser display based on Octolively

We dropped by ARMTechCon last week to check out a tip sent in by email (thanks, Barry!) that Mouser Electronics was displaying something that looked like our Octolively modules.

Kids interacting with LEDs
Photo courtesy of Mouser

Mouser staff had been inspired by an installation of our Interactive LED Panels to create something interactive that they could show off at Engineers Week at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. They used the Octolively as the basis for their project, and the kids loved it of course.

Blue "M" in LEDs

For trade shows, they built up a display with a mix of blue and white LEDs to show off the Mouser “M”. Based on the foot traffic it got while I was at the booth, it is quite popular.

ATmega164P

They made some minor changes from our original Octolively design and used different connector types to highlight Mouser’s product lines. The heart of the project is still the 40-pin DIP ATmega164P (perhaps anomalous at an ARM conference) running our Octolively code, which gave the Mouser folks a chance to play with some microcontroller programming.

Interactive display based on Octolively

It’s always exciting to see a derivative of one of our projects in the wild. Thanks to the Mouser folks for sharing their project story and sending the museum picture for us to share.